Tweak up

As part of my series of starting points before I can work out what to learn with this subject.

Ten types of tweets

Lisa Barone offers 9 types of tweets – exactly what I was seeking and against which I plan to evaluate my own tweeting practices. However, Lisa introduces it as list for people new to using social media.  That being the case, I’d assume they’ve not yet attracted a large following, so her suggestions might be more practical in almost reverse order – and one she didn’t mention:

*. Complain (politely) about a product problem

Creators (particularly of social media tools) and their competitors are monitoring these days, and they’ll be eager to present a solution; or others might have found workarounds.

1. Slice of life  (Just to warm up perhaps?) (Good to combine with Buddy Media’s advice (below) to tweet images)

2. Conversation: “People are talking all around you.”

  1. Search twitter streams for topics and content that interests you
  2. follow any whose content seems largely to fit your interest
  3. if only one or tweets are interesting – see if you can stretch one or two to conversation

3. Solve other people’s problems: “Find a question you feel confident to answer, and then hop into the conversation.”

4. Retweeting information:

If you’re on twitter for community connection, then finding people whose content is interesting to you will serve two purposes – it provides you with a model; and give you material to retweet.  Retweet also serves two purposes: shares interesting things with people who follow you; and tells the original tweeter what you’re interested in.

5. Community highlighting: It’s not about you!

(Lisa refers to tweeting about someone who: left a really insightful comment on your blog post (link to the comment permalink); or who just released an e-book you want to share; or who was just invited to speak at an industry conference.)

6. Link to your blogposts if you’re blogging.

7. Opinions/Disagreement:

I agree with telling people what inspires you, but Lisa’s first recommendation about sharing the things you hate?  My mother’s caution about not saying anything if nothing nice can be said echoes in my ears.  Plus, why promote something with which you disagree?  On the other hand, a provocative title linking to a blogpost (perhaps of your own) that contains sturdy critique – that’s constructive.

8. Information sharing:

“Tweet links to interesting articles you read, industry research, studies, or anything else you think your audience would enjoy.”

9. Questions:

By this time you may have a larger following, and if they can’t answer they might retweet for you.

“Moushkateer” by James Blann on Flickr. (2009) CC:BY-NC-ND/2.0

Five tweeting strategies

Lee (2012) derived 5 strategies from Buddy Media’s analysis and/or their newsrelease.

  1. Keep Tweets Short
  2. Use one or two hashtags
  3. Use Images in your Tweets
  4. Add a call to action
  5. Spell out the word “Retweet”

Lee’s post is the first time I have seen ClickToTweet in action.  Ever wanted to tweet a point hidden within a post, found the button’s auto-title not quite to your point, and struggled to synthesise something tweet-worthy?  This could help your reader’s overcome that hurdle. I would recommend that Lee make use of anchor title to explain the feature, or preview the autotext.

For my learning plan:

  • I will want to consider how some of these translate to institutional twitter accounts (eg ‘slice of life’ & ‘disagreement’).
  • Because I have done almost all of the above except yet called to action or spelled out the word “Retweet”
    Just discovered (via google) Snap Bird for searching my own tweets. And what do you know, once upon a time one of my RT contained the word “Retweet” as a call to action 🙂
Try snapbird yourself
snapbird found the time I retweeted QF1’s game showing a friend how far a tweet would reach. Not that I usually participate in chain events.